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In the post-covid return to work, women are most affected

The IMCO reports that women are returning to jobs with poor conditions and without social security

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  • 30/09/2020
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In the post-covid return to work, women are most affected
In the post-covid return to work, women are most affected (Photo: Cuartoscuro)

The IMCO (the Mexican Institute for Competitiveness) highlights that men are returning to the labor market faster than women facing disadvantages. The diagnosis titled women in the post covid economy is a new area of #womenineconomy.

Although there is a slight economic recovery since June, men are returning to the labor market faster than women. Women go back to jobs with disadvantageous conditions and without social security. From April to July 2020, there was an increase from 14% to 23%. Simultaneously, the rate of unpaid workers doubled, according to the National Survey of Occupation and Employment (ENOE) 2020.

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Women compress in sectors most affected by the pandemic

According to ENOE 2020, 53% of employed women work in some service activity, while men's percentage is 36%. Remote work favors men more than women, as well as higher-income employees. A CEEY study shows that at the highest income level, three out of every ten workers are men employed in jobs that can be carried out from home, while there are only two women in the same type of employment. In this report, the Mexican Institute for Competitiveness (IMCO) seeks to understand the potential economic effects of COVID-19 on female workers. Women spend more than twice as much time doing house chores.

Women dedicate 64% of their hours a week to the home, while men only 24%. The lack of face-to-face classes has exacerbated this situation, and these factors increase the gap in labor inequality between men and women.

The pandemic has emphasized women's double burden: they struggle to generate income while absorbing more house chores.

Women dedicate 64% of their hours a week to domestic duties, while men only 24%.

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Women are underrepresented in leadership positions

According to McKinsey, in the private sector, the percentage of women decreases as hierarchy levels increase. Although 37% of the entry-level are women, only 10% of executive committees and 8% of general directorates have female representation.

Actions to protect female talent

According to a McKinsey study, if Mexico had an economic participation rate of women the same as men, an additional 810 billion dollars could be generated in 2025, equivalent to 70% of the national GDP. Mexico needs more studies and policies that serve as a guide to avoid the loss or deterioration of female jobs.

To do this, IMCO proposes:

-Strengthen statistics to measure gender gaps.

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-Expand the childcare system so that it benefits informal workers.

-Encourage the adoption of corporate policies for life-work integration.

-Generate incentives for middle and high school women to continue studying.

-Design social programs in which women workers from vulnerable groups are a priority.

Traducción: Valentina K. Yanes